NAE Recognizes 2011 Grand Challenges Scholars

Release Date: May 11, 2011

For Immediate Release
Contact:
Randy Atkins
Senior Media Relations Officer
National Academy of Engineering
202.334.1508, atkins@nae.edu

May 11, 2011 – WASHINGTON – The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) congratulates 14 students for graduating as NAE Grand Challenges Scholars in 2011.  The students will receive diplomas this month from Duke University, Louisiana Tech University, and Olin College of Engineering.  There are currently 41 Grand Challenges Scholars programs either operating or in development in the United States.

The Grand Challenges Scholars program stemmed from the NAE's 14 Grand Challenges for Engineering.  It is a combined curricular and extra-curricular program designed to prepare students to work on problems whose solutions could dramatically improve quality of life around the world.  In 2009, leaders from Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering, the Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, and the University of Southern California’s Viterbi School of Engineering proposed this new education model. The program employs a number of components, including: research experience, an interdisciplinary curriculum (referred to as Engineering +), entrepreneurship, a global dimension, and service learning.

The 2011 NAE Grand Challenges Scholars are as follows: 

Duke University
Anna Brown, Jared Dunnmon, Ben Gagne, Francesco LaRocca, Trisha Lowe, Niru Maheswaranathan, Lyndsey Morgan, Eng Seng Ng, and Eric Thorne

Louisiana Tech:
Stephanie Parker and Louis Reis

Olin College:
Marco Morales, Andy Pethan, and Christina Powell

Below is the list of 2010 graduates from the program:

Duke University:
Matthew Baron, Vyshak Chandra, Jason Chen, Adam Grasch, Margaret Hoff, Xiao Li, Jamie Lou, Will Patrick, Jai Singh, and Patrick Ye

Olin College:
Ellen Chisa and Matthew Ritter

The National Academy of Engineering is an independent, nonprofit institution.  Its members consist of the nation's premier engineers, who are elected by their peers for seminal contributions to engineering.  The academy provides leadership and guidance to government on the application of engineering resources to social, economic, and security problems.  Established in 1964, NAE operates under the congressional charter granted to the National Academy of Sciences in 1863.

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