Making the Case for Technological Literacy

National Symposium on Technological Literacy

Event Details
January
17
2002
09
00
AM
to
January
17
2002
05
00
PM
National Academies Auditorium
2101 Constitution Ave., NW
Washington DC
Contact
Greg Pearson
Contact Greg Pearson
Phone202-334-2282
gpearson@nae.edu

This one-day event marked the release of Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. This report, from a committee of experts convened by the National Academy of Engineering and the National Research Council, concludes that although the United States is increasingly dependent on technology, its citizens are not equipped to think critically about technology.

The committee's findings are consistent with the first-ever Gallup poll on technological literacy, commissioned by the International Technology Education Association (ITEA). The poll results were also released at the symposium.

9:00 a.m. Coffee, registration
 
9:30 a.m. Welcome and Introduction of Keynote
Wm. A. Wulf, President, National Academy of Engineering
Listen to Wm. A. Wulf's welcome.
 
9:45 a.m. Keynote Address
William D. Hansen, Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Education
Listen to William Hansen's remarks.
 
10:15 a.m. Q&A
Deputy Secretary Hansen
Susan Sclafani, Counselor to the Secretary of Education
Listen to the keynote Q&A session.
 
10:30 a.m.

Release of "Technically Speaking" (public briefing) 
Jonathan Cole, Provost and Dean of Faculties, Columbia University, and panel:

  • Rod Custer, Chair, Department of Industrial Technology, Illinois State University;
  • Goéry Delacôte, Executive Director, Exploratorium;
  • Karen Falkenberg, Emory University, Atlanta;
  • Kathryn Thornton, Director, Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education, University of Virginia
11:00 a.m. Q&A with Committee
 
11:45 a.m. Lunch
Box lunches for symposium attendees
 
1:00 p.m.

Release of ITEA Gallup poll (public briefing)
William Dugger, Director, Technology for All Americans Project and panel: 

1:30 p.m. Q&A with ITEA Panel
 
2:00 p.m. Technological Literacy: An Industry Perspective
Carl F. Kohrt, President and CEO, Battelle
Text of his remarks
 
2:30 p.m. Technological Literacy: A View from the Hill
Rep. Rush Holt (D-NJ), U.S. Congress
Text of his remarks
 
3:00 p.m. Technological Literacy: What Informal Education Has to Offer
Alan Friedman, Director, New York Hall of Science
Text of his remarks
 
3:30 p.m. Closing Remarks
Jonathan Cole, Provost and Dean of Faculties, Columbia University
 
4:00 - 5:00 p.m. Reception - Great Hall
 

 

 

Speeches
Technically Speaking: A View from the Hill
National Symposium on Technological Literacy

First, I would like to congratulate the Committee on Technological Literacy, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Research Council on a compelling report that really emphasizes the need for better technology education in our country. I'd also like to express my gratitude to the National Science Foundation and Bastille Memorial Institute for sponsoring this important work.

I am honored to speak here today on a subject that is close to my heart. As you probably know, I received my education in physics; however, through my career, I have worked as a college professor, a research scientist in alternative energy, an arms control expert at the State Department, and now as a Member of the United States House of Representatives. As you can imagine, in these different careers, I have observed a vast range of technological literacy. Today, though, I'd like to focus on my observations of technological literacy as a Member of ... More

Speech
Technically Speaking: A View from the Hill
Technology Literacy: What Informal Education Has to Offer
National Symposium on Technological Literacy

Technology Literacy: What Informal Education Has to Offer

Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology makes a convincing case for creating a technically literate public. The report stresses what the formal education system is doing, and what it could be doing. But the report also acknowledges strongly the potential of informal learning to contribute to this literacy.

As Technically Speaking reports, over 70% of Americans are not in school. Even those who are enrolled in school or college spend a great deal of their time outside of the classroom, and not all of that doing their homework. A back of the envelope calculation would suggest that 92% of any individual’s lifetime is spent engaged in pursuits other than formal, curriculum-guided education. So informal learning is not only a supplemental channel we can enlist in the service of technology literacy; it is potentially a major player ... More

Speech
Technology Literacy: What Informal Education Has to Offer
National Tech Lit Symposium - Carl Kohrt Remarks
National Symposium on Technological Literacy

Thank you for that kind introduction -- I'm truly honored to represent Battelle at the official release of Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need To Know More About Technology.

I’d like to commend the National Academy of Engineering and the National Research Council for their support of this study, and I’d especially like to recognize Greg Pearson and A. Thomas Young along with their fellow committee members, for their part in assembling such a thorough and thoughtful document. Doug Olesen, Battelle’s recently-retired CEO and my predecessor, served with Tom on a corporate Board of Directors and shared Tom’s commitment to this project as do I.

I’ve been asked to comment on the importance -- and role -- of technological literacy from an "industry perspective." I will do so in a somewhat parochial manner. Surely most everyone attending this Symposium agrees that technological literacy -- ... More

Speech
National Tech Lit Symposium - Carl Kohrt Remarks