Health Risks of Indoor Exposures to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions

Project Status
Completed
January 19, 2024
Sponsor
Environmental Protection Agency
Final Report
Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions
Authoring InstitutionNational Academy of Engineering; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Publication DateJanuary 01, 2024
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At-a-Glance
The National Academies is convening an expert committee to consider the state-of the-science on the health risks of exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) indoors and engineering solutions and interventions to reduce risks of exposure to it indoors, including practical mitigation solutions to reduce exposure in residential settings.
Key Contacts
  • David Butler
    J. Herbert Hollomon Scholar and Director, Cultural, Ethical, Social, and Environmental Responsibility in Engineering (CESER) Program
    National Academy of Engineering
    E-mail
    Office
    202.334.2524

The National Academies is convening an expert committee to consider the state-of the-science on the health risks of exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) indoors and engineering solutions and interventions to reduce risks of exposure to it indoors, including practical mitigation solutions to reduce exposure in residential settings.

The NASEM shall convene a committee of scientific experts to consider the state-of the-science on the health risks of exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) indoors and engineering solutions and interventions to reduce risks of exposure to it indoors, including practical mitigation solutions to reduce exposure in residential settings. Specifically, the committee shall focus on:

  • synthesizing and summarizing recent scientific literature to assess the health risks of indoor exposure to PM2.5; and
  • identification and analysis of practical intervention approaches for PM2.5 indoors.

The committee’s consideration of this information shall lead to a consensus study report with findings and recommendations regarding 1) the key implications of the scientific research for public health, including potential near-term opportunities for incorporating what is known into public health practice, and 2) where additional research will be most critical to understanding indoor exposure to PM2.5 and the effectiveness of interventions. As appropriate, opportunities for advancing such research by addressing methodological or technological barriers or enhancing coordination or collaboration will be noted. The indoor environments considered in this report will be limited to non-industrial exposure within buildings.