In This Issue
Summer Issue of The Bridge on Changing the Conversation about Engineering
June 27, 2011 Volume 41 Issue 2
Articles In This Issue
  • Wednesday, June 29, 2011
    AuthorMarisa Wolsky

    WGBH is using the multimedia resources of two major projects to engage young people in innovative ways.

    In an address to the National Academy of Sciences on April 29, 2009, President Obama challenged his listeners: “I want us all to think about new and creative ways to engage young ...

  • Wednesday, June 29, 2011
    AuthorJanet L. Yowell and Jacquelyn F. Sullivan

    The University of Colorado Boulder Teams Program reaches thousands of youngsters annually.

    Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
    —Confucius

    Being an engineer takes creativity, hard work, and perseverance. As Marie points out in the excerpt ...

  • Tuesday, June 28, 2011
    AuthorMaria Ivancin

    Despite many challenges, the engineering community is poised to launch an effective outreach campaign.

    Joining forces for protection, to achieve a common goal, or to take advantage of an opportunity is not a new idea. Countries have formed alliances to fight common foes. Political ...

  • Tuesday, June 28, 2011
    AuthorMitch Baranowski

    The engineering profession hopes to reshape public perceptions by emphasizing its creative aspects and its world-improving impact.

    I grew up in Texas, the grandson of a cattle rancher. So I was raised with a notion of branding in its purest form—a mark of ownership. The scar of a ...

  • Tuesday, June 28, 2011
    AuthorCharles M. Vest

    To reach our strategic goals, we must have a well educated, globally competitive workforce.

    This is an age in which we are fixated on near-term issues, especially in the political domain, where immediate goals crowd out strategic goals. It has become a truism that members of Congress are in ...

  • Tuesday, June 28, 2011
    AuthorEllen Kullman

    Editor's Note

    A major topic of conversation in the nation’s capitol, and the nation’s living rooms, is how well the United States will compete in the global marketplace of the future. The answer will depend largely on how well we, as parents, business leaders, teachers, and ...